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CSPAN
Jan 5, 2010 6:00am EST
. more on the report from the centers of medicare and medicaid services. susan host this isçó 55-minute event. >> i'm susan denser, happy new year and welcome to our briefing on health care numbers. that is ritual as the medicare and medicaid services as well as health affairs to bring out these spending numbers every year, and we're delighted to be able to do that once more. this year we have historic numbers to help act twares and others unveil. and as you will hear and perhaps already read we had an historic slowdown in the rate of health care spending as well as rate of growth in 50 years.ç] of course the other side of the story is health care spending still grew faster than the overall economy so we're not out of our long-term projectry with the health differing to pay for the health 06 our folks.Ñi and i will turn it over to our folks from cms to present the data. you'll be hearing from micah hartman. with the office of the act tware at the centers for medicare medicaid services or cms. he works primarily on historical and age-basedçó national health care spending benefits and
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 6:00am EST
to lower the costs of medicare and medicaid and it will not cost anybody anything. that is great politics, it is just not true. so there has got to be some test of realism in any of thesexd proposals, mine included. i have to hold myself accountable and guarantee the american people will hold me accountable if what i am selling does not actually deliver. >> mr. president, a point of clarification. what is in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals that were offered. >> i understand that. i have actually read your bills. >> through 2009. >> i a understand. -- i understand. >> the summary document you receive this backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi android restoration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> i have read your legislation. i take a look at this stuff and the good ideas we take. here is the thing that all this have to be mindful of. @@@@@@@@@ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ @ and support for faith and the un employed and helping people stay on cobra that democrats and republicans would support. maybe there are some things in th
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2010 11:00pm EST
on the republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. the so-called reduction in medicare -- is this information or misinformation? are they really going to reduce the amount of money in medicare to pay for this plan? also, the public option. how come they do not want to fight for that? it seems to me that it would be a good way to go. if people are insuring -- purchasing insurance, they are responsible for reading the policy and numbing their coverage. it is just like taking out a loan. if you sign on the dotted line, you are responsible because it is a contract. i think republicans are just fear-mongering, trying to kill the bill simply because of the input of lobbyists. host: thank you for the call. guest: public comment on the medicare question. the pieces in the legislation that would reduce cost under medicare are comprised of a number of components that have been discussed by legislative advisory commissions in the past, such as the medicare advisory council, which advises congress on issues of payment in medicare. issues have also been raised by the congressional b
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 1:00pm EST
reviews and investigations of medicare and medicaid fraud. some have resulted in prosecutions and other in new program integrity functions to prevent health care fraud. he has been the inspector general since september 2004 and is the senior official responsible for audits, evaluations, investigations, and general law enforcement for all hhs projects. it is an honor to introduce my colleague, dan levinson. [applause] >> thank you very much. i cannot pass up an opportunity to say hello, good morning, and welcome you here as early as possible. this is such an important event for our office of inspector general because fighting fraud is what we are all about. on behalf of the 1500 dedicated professionals of our office, welcome to what looks to be a very interesting and what i undoubtedly believe will be very productive day as we gather throughout these breakout sessions to drill down on some of the most important issues concerning health-care integrity that our programs face. again, i think you will be hearing this from others as well, when one of every three americans depends upon an effi
CSPAN
Jan 31, 2010 6:00am EST
. >> okay. what if we froze the topline of medicare medicare, medicaid, social security, and the very same discretionary spending that the president announced for tonight's speech for the same time period? how much would that save? >> i can't think of the categories off hand but it would've saved a great deal of money. i think the challenge is to decide what the top line cap on medicare spending, what does that mean to medicare beneficiaries, who is that will not get paid in an amount that would've been paid without that cap. >> okay. let's say that you reduce the benefits to wealthy americans who did pay that money into social security, means tested the payouts and did it that way. >> so on social security side, with picking sort of a dollar amount up front it's easier to change those rules then want to do this sort of thing as you suggest. exactly how much you'd save depends on just what thresholds you picked and how the testing worked. >> mr. chairman, thanks a million. [inaudible] >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> dr. elmendorf, thank you for being here. i applaud president obama for taki
CSPAN
Jan 3, 2010 10:30am EST
, that is not the way to do it. what we should do is what medicare did in 1965. it was a christmas tree in the beginning. that is how they got the legislation passed. after that, then they started putting restrictions. in fact, we must be doing a good job, because now everyone is -- scared that medicare pays so little because it is too stingy in its payment. we did put cost controls and later. medicare does have its financial problems. let me end by saying, i think the public option would have had the potential to control costs, because you could sell insurance, it would garner market share. that could allow for the consolidated purchasing power i talked about to reduce costs which would bring more buyers there. reading the newspapers, it does not look like we will have a public option. that would be the one way in which i could see a health care reform having potential for controlling costs. on a positive note, it is not about costs or dead. if we move towards universal coverage, we are going to be creating a system that will be more malleable to the changes we want to see with regard to cost containme
CSPAN
Jan 4, 2010 8:00pm EST
insurance plans pay under part d of medicare for prescription drugs. they are taking advantage of their purchasing power. and we're relying on private insurers committee are' competition in part d of medicare, it isn't as effective as the v.a. which does take advantage of its market power. let me just talk for a moment on a private insurance. we rely on private insurance here. it's for-profit insurance. i think it leads to much higher health care costs. private insurers, obviously by definition, they have to make a profit. in addition to that they engage in marketing, they also engage in what we call medical understood writing, they have to hire a lot of actuaries to make sure that they're not taking on people who are too expensive. these are all very costly things. so that raises the price of private insurance. in addition, as i said, they don't have as much bargaining power so they also can't keep their prices low by taking advantage of the consolidated power that i'm talking about. so you might ask, why do we allow private insurance to have quasi-monopoly and the answer is t
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 11:00pm EST
for this? cutting half a trillion dollars out of medicare and you are going to be taxing people at a time they cannot afford it. we can do better. we can go back to the drawing board. it will not take 15 years. not on my watch. i will make it a priority to have coverage that states can rely on and have the flexibility. not a one-size-fits-all for the country and the hurting states. >> i am going to turn to you and you can -- all of you have talked about the economy. voters put jobs at the top of their list. everyone is worried about 10% unemployment. it is also true that this terrible economic situation workers find themselves in comes at the end of a lost decade for american workers. there has been nationwide, no net job growth since december, 1999 and middle class families when adjusted for inflation have not seen their incomes rise. what are your plans not only short term but what is the answer to the long-term challenge for jobs for americans? >> if i can no to that the congressional budget office says within 10 years that health care plan will be deficit neutral. one of the reasons w
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2010 1:00pm EST
for medicaid and medicare is of such services. >> the morning. i am susan dencer. happy new year and welcome to our briefing on the national health spending numbers. this is a ritual at the centers for medicare and medicaid services as well as for health affairs to bring out these spending numbers every year, and we are delighted to be able to do that once more. this year we have a historic set of numbers to help cms actuaries and other members unveiled. as you were here and perhaps already read, who have had a historic slowdown in the rate of health spending, the slowest rate of growth in 50 years. of course, the other side of the story is that health spending still grew faster than the overall economy, so we are not out of our long-term trajectory of health-care spending growth continuing to outpace the growth in the gross domestic product. with no further ado, i am going to turn it over to our five panelists to present the data further. you will be hearing from mika hartmann, a statistician in the health statistics group. he works primarily on historical and age-based national health esti
CSPAN
Jan 2, 2010 11:00pm EST
insurers competition for medicare, it is not as effective as the va which does take advantage of its buying power. for-profit insurance does lead to higher health-care costs. they have to make a profit. in addition, they engage in marketing. they also engage in medical underwriting they have to hire a lot of actuaries to make sure that they're not taking on people who are too expensive. these are all very costly things. it raises the price of private insurance. they do not have as much bargaining power so they can keep their prices low, like taking advantage of consolidated power. then why do we allow private insurers to have equality monopoly? there is no reason to think that savings would be transferred to the public. nonprofit insurance. -- what you really need is nonprofit insurance. let me just end with a few thoughts on how health care reform -- as you know, congress does very little to control health-care costs. that is probably a reasonable short-term strategy. the proposals do nothing to consolidate purchasing power. the caveat is the public auction. -- the public plan. they do wel
CSPAN
Jan 11, 2010 8:00pm EST
the medicare advantage. we did nursing home standards and passed the law 25 years ago and have never had a hearing on that. long-term care insurance, are consumers protected? june 16th, termination of individual health insurance policies. if you are buying an individual family policy eiffel application, right? we had two hearings on this. when you fill up the insurance policy, most companies have about 1400 different codes. you go to the local drugstore in the fill up the prescription. if you trigger a code that will review your policy because with that code triggered might be very expensive medical treatment might be facing in the future and therefore they will jump you -- dump you. for instance, one family as they were filling out the form the told him to put out he was 180 pounds but he was really 250 pounds. they dumped him and said he lied on his application. when it terminated from your health insurance policy, who do you appeal to? the company that just the end user you do not have a repeal rights. -- the company that just dumped you so you don't have repeal rights. they're all ki
CSPAN
Jan 4, 2010 11:00pm EST
on the report from members of the center of medicare and medicaid services. this is a 55 minute event. >> good morning, i'm the editor in chief of health affairs. having a year. welcome to our briefing on the health spending numbers. this is a ritual at the center for medicare and medicaid services as willis health affairs to bring out the spending numbers every year. we are delighted to be able to do that once more. this year we have a historic set of numbers to help others unveil. you will hear and perhaps you have already read the historic slow down in health-care spending in 2008. the slowest rate of growth in 50 years. on the other side of the story some health-care spending grew faster than the overall economy. we are not out of our long-term trajectory. we continue to outpace the growth in the gdp. with no further ado, i will turn into our fine folks who will explain the data further. this person is very knowledgeable. we will hear from another person who is an economist at the centers for medicare and medicaid services. she was primarily on historical state based spending. she and her
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2010 8:00pm EST
about the condition of social security and of medicare, both teetering the tremendous federal deficit that seems to be getting bigger and bigger and wondering, how in the world we are going to pay for this. >> you raise an extremely important point. a bit of history, and then my sense of what is next. at the beginning of 2009, it was theç general judgmentç of çeconomists, conservatives, moderates, liberals, economists all across the political spectrum that there was a real prospect our country could have had aç depressionú prospect of deflation. it said there wasç an argument then for stimulusç legislation. you can debate whether it should have included this or that or something else, but there was a consensus that some stimulus was needed. çnow, certainly, many months later, we wake up and our government owns a car companyt( an insurance company, an investment house, and people are çsaying, excuse me? what is next? çgivenç all of these deficits? and i do believe that it isççe for the government to put in place something of an exit strategy soç that, in some
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 2:00pm EST
upfront? all the other states lose medicare vantage within five years, but florida is to keep it? why? these have to be dropped. with all respect to senator reid who says he cannot pass health care without these deals, then he is going nowhere. house members are disappointed, like the american people. there are two things to watch. legislation being made and sausage. -- there are two things you do not want to watch. this should stand on its merit. michigan was one of the first it's economically. -- one of worst states economically. let's pass this on policy. i always thought they would do a trigger. no greater than the rate of inflation, if it goes, trigger a public option. that is one when they talk about a compromise. that makes sense. this the one this side of the room. -- let's go to this side of the room. [inaudible] but it could all be for naught. congress starts january 2011 and said they disagree with health care. they could get rid of it. every congress has a right to review it. congress has been talking about this since teddy roosevelt first proposed a 100 years ago. for us
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2010 1:00pm EST
these are some of the hearings we had. medicare advantage which you'll hear about tonight. predatory sales practice. may 15, 2008, we did nursing home standards. we passed the nursing home standard law 25 years ago. never had a hearing on it. we had the first one. long-term care insurance, our consumers -- are consumers protected? june 16, termination of individual health insurance policies. you buy an individual family polcy, you fill out an application, right? we had two hearings on this. our investigation took us about 18 months into this. when you fill out your insurance policy, there's most insurance companies have about 1,400 different codes. you go to the local drugstore you fill out your prescription, you run it through the insurance company. if you trigger one of those 1,00 codes, they'll probably go through and review your policy because what this code triggered was it might be very expensive medical treatment you'll face in the future and therefore they are going to dump you off your insurance if they can and they do it under thing called rescission. for instance, one family, th
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2010 5:00pm EST
no alternative. medicare is cash negative today. the trustees tellus it will be insolvent in eight years. so security is cash-today, and in your report of the day before yesterday says it will be cashed negative every year except two for the future. you say in your report it will go cash negative and a permanent basis in 2016. anybody that says you did not have to make any changes to those programs, programs i strongly support, and i know i lost my parents when i was young. i got so security that helped me go to college. so i understand its importance in people's lives. i understand the importance of medicare in people's lives. i have seen in my own family. . . @ @ @ ,b number of people who are eligible for these programs, you're going to have to do something on the revenue side as well. so i again welcome you to the committee. and again, thank you for you and your team's extraordinary work your team's extraordinary work during t many months. >> thank you, mr. chairman and senator gregg for your very kind words about our work at cbo. exactly one year today i testified before this committee f
CSPAN
Jan 14, 2010 10:00am EST
for taking my call. the so-called reduction in medicare that the republicans more or less talk about on a regular basis is really -- is it information or misinformation about the program, either the senate or the house of representatives bill, are they going to really reduce the amount of money into medicare to pay for this plan? and also the public option, why is it that they are not wanting to really fight for the public option? it seems to me that that would be a good way to go and if people are purchasing insurance, you know, they're responsible for reading the policy and knowing what coverage they have and, you know, it's just like taking out a loan. if you don't read the fine print and you sign on the dotted line, you're responsible. because it's a contract. andity think the republicans are just fear mongering and trying to kill the bill simply because of the input of the lobbyists from the insurance, you know, the big corporations. host: thanks for your call. guest: a comment on the medicare question briefly. the pieces in the health legislation that would reduce costs under m
CSPAN
Jan 27, 2010 7:00am EST
social security and medicare and medicaid, probably the two main things basically bleeding us dry. but basically it is suicide to talk about those two. so we are going to have to go with, i guess, the spending cuts that he suggested. that is basically all i have to say. host: little rock, arkansas. paul on the republican line. caller: the morning, greta. i would like the president to talk about jobs and the economy. and during the campaign he promised to save millions of jobs. also promised to create millions of dollars. since he has been president he has created a huge deficit, sent $100 million to haiti, and there are many people right here in america who are unemployed, people who need jobs, and i feel that he should concentrate on taking care of the american people first. host: that is the headline in "the wall street journal" and "the new york times." it says -- host: new york city, luis, independent line. the trustee secretary will be testifying about what he knew about aig and that will be at 10:00 a.m. eastern time live on c-span3. also testifying as former treasury secret
CSPAN
Jan 17, 2010 1:00pm EST
% of all health care is run by the government today. medicare, medicaid, indian health service, military, and v.a., tricare. 60% of it is run by the government. one of the reasons you have an absolute shortage of primary care doctors in this country is because we have set the price for what they're going to pay for primary care and the doctors won't go into it anymore, because there's a 350% payment differential. so we can either embrace our heritage, which says we've relied on markets to allocate scarce resources, or we can deny it and allow the government to run it. i think the health care bill ultimately will pass. i think they're going to buy the votes. you saw what happened in the senate. they're going to dot exact same thing in -- do the exact same thing in the house to get the votes they need and we will have a health care bill that the president will sign. don't think it's the best answer for us as a nation. i can tell you what's in that bill. it puts the government in charge of what you'll get, when you'll get it and where you'll get it, and that's even if you have private insur
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2010 2:00pm EST
a grant funded by the national institute on aging to examine the -- examined the impact of medicare part de on medicare -- on nursing home residents. she also has a steady among cancer patients. that funding is provided by the national cancer institute and the department of veteran affairs. we're happy to have her here to speak about her article. we also have david stevenson whose recent work has focused on a range of topics in that sector, including long-term care financing options, the rising use of hospice care, and so on. we are delighted to have him speaking on the and assisted care -- on the assisted care piece. mary jane koren manages the commonwealth fund at the harvard program. she is an internist. she was vice president of the leslie samuels foundation in new york city prior to joining commonwealth. she began her career in geriatrics where she started a fellowship program and was the assistant medical director for the home health care agency. she has had plenty of experience in the real world. she is had plenty of experience in the real world delivery of these services. let's w
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2010 11:00pm EST
't talking about medicare advantage when they referred that. the bills in the house and senate include massive cuts in the medicare advantage program. and so people that have med can care advantage have vin vative new private insurance available for million office seniors and me digap policy. but also recognizing that the business of creating the massive new government run health insurance exchanges. and then allowing businesses to not offer health insurance if they just pay an 8 percent tax to the federal government will create an incentive where you'll see by some estimate maybe 100,000,000 americans could lose insurance through they're employers. not because the government would make them drop they're insurance you understand? you know, i think i remember the president saying one time, nothing in this bill requires you to give up your insurance. - or you know give up insurance you have through your employer but respectfully as i've said, it's hard to keep the healthcare insurance you have at the place of employment if your employer cancels it. and in this tough economy and i don't h
CSPAN
Jan 23, 2010 6:00am EST
, but will not be if we don't make some changes. now, here's the good news. compared to medicare, social security is actually in reasonably good shape, and with some relatively small adjustments, you can have that solvent for a long time. so social security is going to be there. i know a lot of people are concerned about it. social security we can fix. now, in terms of the cola, the formula -- cola stands for cost of living allowance, so it's put in place to make sure that social security is keeping up with inflation. here's the problem. this past year, because of the severity of the recession, we didn't have inflation; we actually had deflation. so prices actually fell last year. as a consequence, technically, seniors were not eligible for a cost of living adjustment, to have it go up because prices did not go up in the aggregate. that doesn't mean that individual folks weren't being pinched by higher heating prices or what have you, but on average prices went down. here's what we did. working with these key members of congress here, we did vote to provide a $250 one-time payment to seniors, whi
CSPAN
Jan 12, 2010 8:00pm EST
to the president's bill, but asked in return for some relief of the reimbursement under medicare to the physicians elimination of this flawed formula that year after year after year forces the doctors to take these deep cuts so that they can't -- literally can't afford to continue to see medicare patients and of course the request, mr. speaker, at that particular meeting back in chicago probably last may or june of 2009 that there be some meaningful medical liability tort reform. the c.b.o., in fact, estimated that that would save $54 billion. just that one issue would save $54 billion. the c.b.o. says over 10 years, mr. speaker, i respectfully suggest that's a most conservative estimate on their part. i think it would be $54 billion each and every year over the next 10 years. but in any regard, i am blessed tonight to be joined by a number of the members of the g.o.p. doctors' caucus, and we're going to talk about the main theme of tonight, and that is the issue of transparency. and i want to get into that in just a second. nothing could be more important, particularly at this point, this 11th ho
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 11:00pm EST
. spending related to medicare, medicaid and social security will not be affected. neither will national security. all other discretionary programs will. finally, i have called for a bipartisan commission that will sit down and hammer out concrete deficit reduction proposals by a certain deadline. because we have heard plenty of talk and a lot of yelling on tv about deficits. it is time to come together and make the painful tauruses we need to eliminate those deficits. this past week, 53 democrats and republicans voted for this commission in the senate. but a failed when seven republicans who had co- sponsoring the idea in the first place suddenly decided to vote against it. that is one thing to have an honest difference of opinion, i will always respect to those that take a principled stand for what they believe even if i disagree with them. but what i want except is changing positions because it is good politics. . . >> less than an hour, that's how long they interrogated a terrorist and he was given a miranda warning and lawyer and not surprisingly he stopped talking. ho did we get to
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2010 7:00am EST
to more commons. for example, with the healthcare, it is medicare and medicaid going bankrupt. if you brought in as the private insurers are able to jury began bring in healthy individuals to medicare -- are able to bring in and cherry pick healthy individuals -- perhaps a sliding scale -- it could bring healthy individuals paying full premiums into medicare to balance out the expenses we have now to pay for 65 and over. as you get older more medical bills. i would be interested to see c- span have some accountant or actuarial come in to run the numbers that exist for the private health insurers and have them make their profits. how to make medicare at a fee. host: banks, we will go at this point because we will have an hour-long later on health care. today concerning the senate, your view, the independent line from anderson, indiana. caller: it is truly disgusting after the display of the health care fiasco you have seen. the conservative an element is tearing up the fabric of democracy. after watching the sonia sotomayor confirmation hearings you have a 99 white guys who question pe
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 10:00am EST
. these are some of the hearings we have had. you're going to hear about the medicare advantage. we did nursing home standards and passed the law 25 years ago and have never had a hearing on that. long-term care insurance, are consumers protected? june 16th, termination of individual health insurance policies. if you are buying an individual family policy eiffel application, right? we had two hearings on this. when you fill up the insurance policy, most companies have about 1400 different codes. you go to the local drugstore in the fill up the prescription. if you trigger a code that will review your policy because with that code triggered might be very expensive medical treatment might be facing in the future and therefore they will jump you -- dump you. for instance, one family as they were filling out the form the told him to put out he was 180 pounds but he was really 250 pounds. they dumped him and said he lied on his application. when it terminated from your health insurance policy, who do you appeal to? the company that just the end user you do not have a repeal rights. -- the company th
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2010 2:00am EST
medicare advantage, and they were referring to that because the bills in the house and senate contain massive cuts. if people that have medicare advantage and the innovative program available to millions of seniors through medicare -- that goes away. also, this business of creating massive new government-run health insurance exchanges and allowing businesses to not offer health insurance to their employees if they just pay and 8% tax to the federal government is going to create an incentive for you are going to see, by some estimates, maybe a hundred million americans could lose the health insurance they currently have with their employer. it is not because the government would make the employer dropped their health insurance regan -- health insurance. i think our remember the president's saying nothing in this bill will make you give up the insurance you have through your employer. i would say respectfully, it is awfully hard to keep the health insurance you have at your place of employment if your employer cancels it, and in this tough economy -- it is tough all over in this country
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2010 1:00pm EST
that doctors treating medicare patients knew what they'd be getting years out so that medicare would have a stability that it needs. i yield back. mr. cantor: i thank the gentleman, madam speaker. and i would say again, somehow in the gentleman's memory of these past years there is something that's left out and that is the -- this body and congress. because during the clinton years, the clinton years that saw prosperity, there was a republican control of congress. and they yielded tax policies that we believe could once again get us back on track. in the same way all the job losses that the gentleman continues to recite and point fingers and blame on the prior administration, if we're going to play that game, i would say that since his party has taken control of this body we've lost in this country 6.1 million jobs. as he says, none of the job losses are acceptable. there are many ways to look at these figures and who was responsible for what and could claim credit for such. but at the end of the day what we're facing right now is a situation where the american people and the small busine
CSPAN
Jan 15, 2010 1:00pm EST
, medicare and otherwise, being asked to pay for that additional -- setting aside something that unionized workers will not have to face for an additional five years? >> i think some of the revenue questions are obviously part of the discussions that are ongoing. the president has made a commitment that he will keep to ensure that this legislation is fully paid for. again, it is something that is a little different that is going on in washington these days. this is a proposal that will be scored and it will be rendered a judgment as to the fact that the president will pay for every ççdime in this bill. the compensated for in taxes for additional medicare savings? >> again, i think some of the discussions are ongoing. >> on healthcare, the last month or six weeks you all have proceeded with no republican support, no republican negotiations as far as anyone can tell, 60-40 votes. and it looked like you were on the glide path to passing it in the senate's with democratic- only boats. you now faced the prospect in çmassachusettsç of possibly needing a republican vote. is there some reg
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2010 1:00pm EST
- term liabilities is medicare, medicaid, and health care spending. nothing comes close. social security would probably fix the same way to and ronald reagan sat down together and could figure something out. that is manageable. medicare and medicaid are a massive problem down the road. that is going to be what our children have to worry about. paul's approach, i want to be careful to not simplify this because i know you have a lot of detail in your plan, but i understand it to say that we will provide doctors of some sort for current medicare recipients at the current level. 55 and over. there is a grandfathering in for future beneficiaries. i just want to point out that i have read it. the basic idea is that at some point, we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not go way out of black. i am sure there are some details -- we hold medicare costs per recipient constant as a way of making sure that it does not have things going out of wahack. it has to be reformed for the younger generations because it is going bankrupt. why not give people the sa
CSPAN
Jan 10, 2010 6:00am EST
middle-age because the pattern of the war. most are going to qualify for medicare any way. the va has excess capacity. soon it's going to have a lot more excess capacity. it is less the world war ii generation and the korean war passalong. it's also been a winning for a decade now has literally offering the best care anywhere on metrics ranging from patient satisfaction to the use of information technology, evidence based medicine. anybody remotely acquainted with the quality of literature on health care the last decade would know the va has the best care anywhere. also, although it is hard to get a card number it appears the cost per patient as compared to medicare is about two-thirds. so this is a triple winner. open up the va to the vets who can use the medicare entitlement not only that, open it up to their wives, let them buy into the system. this now makes clinical sense but 8-year-old veteran scott more bdy with their wife, they have to take care of their tether to the coverage of the buttocks sense because every person of medicare and to the va you have saved about one third a
CSPAN
Jan 13, 2010 5:00pm EST
to resolve their differences between the house and the senate version of the medicare reform legislation that provided prescription drug benefits for medicare recipients. a very important piece of legislation, one that was not without some controversy, the house passed a version, the senate passed a version, and then in the light of day these two versions were negotiated on these days, the american people got to see the discussions that went on and got to see this bill being crafted that eventually became law. if the democrats weren't engaging in these backroom deal making deals, i don't think they'd mind the lights being turned on but the problem is they're cutting deals and the reason they're having to cut deals is because they're trying to pats a -- pass a piece of legislation that the american people don't embrace. many of us agree that health care needs to be reformed. and my colleagues on my side of the aisle, republicans and conservatives, have been offering some commonsense ideas that could reform the current system without turning over the health care to the government, without
CSPAN
Jan 19, 2010 8:00pm EST
% rate increase? senior citizens in my district on average saw a 45% increase in their medicare advantage plans. 45% one year increase. that's simply unsustainable and the government certainly is never going to balance its budget without addressing the cost of health care. the gentleman from ohio. mr. ryan: i'd like to say that this happened. we didn't end up here, you know, a couple of octobers ago and all of a sudden things were just -- happened. our government was controlled by a conservative, neoconservative ideology for most of the first decade in this country. or of this century. from 2000 to 2008 they controlled the white house and from 2000 to 2006 they controlled the congress. implemented their economic philosophy. hook, line and sinker. it got implemented, they controlled all the levers of government, passed their supply side economics, cut taxes for the wealthiest, that will stimulate the economy and, you know, everything will take care of itself, deregulate wall street, everyone will be honest with each other, no one would possibly do anything wrong if we just weren't watching
CSPAN
Jan 28, 2010 6:00am EST
down the deficit, cover the uninsured, strengthen medicare for seniors and stop insurance company abuses, let me know. let me know. i'm eager to see it. here's what i ask congress, though. don't walk away from reform. not now. not when we are so close. let us find a way to come together and finish the job for the american people. let's get it done. let's get it done. now, even if health care reform would reduce our deficit, it's not enough to dig us out of a massive fiscal hole in which we find ourselves. it's a challenge that makes all others that much harder to solve and one that's been subject to a lot of political posturing. so let me start the discussion of government spending by setting the record straight. at the beginning of the last decade, the year 2000, america had a budget surplus of over $200 billion. by the time i took office, we had a one-year deficit of over $1 trillion and projected deficits of $8 trillion over the next decade. most of this was the result of not paying for two wars, two tax cuts, and an expensive prescription drug program. on top of that, the effe
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 8:00pm EST
. with the passage of the medicare modernization act. exactly what they did. and that's -- as we know, that barely squeaked through. it was the famous three-hour vote. which is the other important point to make here. which is that no matter what anybody tells you what the rules are, they make up the rules as they go along. right? and so -- and particularly on the senate side. they can pretty much figure out a way, if they want to, to do what they want. so that said, what happened in 2003, there was not even support within the republican ranks to pass that legislation. there was a huge dispute over whether it was a massive new entitlement or whether it was privatization of medicare or whether that was good or bad, the whole bit. and there was some democratic support. but clearly the bulk of the caucus would not vote for it. what did they do? they kept at it. and they did -- a dark of night series of back room deals. >> and what about the budget? >> and no pay forings. and there's a lot you can do in this town if you aren't -- if you're going to pass a $400 billion plus benefit and not pay for it. i
CSPAN
Jan 24, 2010 6:30pm EST
have been superior. just have medicare for all which would be most simple. the bill you could probably write on one page. gn afraid of blowing up the system. so the catch-22 is in order not to blow up the system you create a con structure that - well, 85 percent of them have healthcare now which they're reasonably satisfied with. >> that's the problem. same way if you came to me and said are you happy with the fire insurance on your house? >> i don't have a fire. i don't know. >> right. so your satisfied. >> the elderly are most apposed to this and they're actually the ones that have used it a most. >> but that's - who covers the elderly byron? >> medicare. >> yes! >> they all have supplemental. >> but the reason, what weaver seen with the remarkable dynamic is that the people that have government healthcare, the elderly are most concerned about the reform precise because they're happy. >> because the president proposed to cut 1/2 billion dollars. it was the only way he could pay for example tending the coverage to people that don't want it. >> and individualism and freedom
CSPAN
Jan 21, 2010 7:00am EST
security. and medicare. people are worried about and no one is talking about. that is what the tea party is all about -- leave social security alone and leave medicare alone and if democrats tried to protect the -- protected, maybe they will keep the seats. but when they keep threatening $500 billion for medicare, 20 million illegal immigrants to get the jobs, they will let a problem. host: are you involved with the tea party or watching from the sidelines? caller: just watching from the sidelines but understand our point. to many people doing our jobs -- nobody wants to talk about illegal immigration. the president is turning his back on it and people are fed up, especially when they talk about social security and medicare. i am a baby boomer. my wife will be caught -- retire pretty soon. we are waiting for this and a lot of people feel the same way. host: doris is watching us from chicago on the democrats' line. caller: he did not mention anything about a 40,000 people who die every year who did not have health insurance. massachusetts told the people of the country, the only state tha
CSPAN
Jan 30, 2010 6:15pm EST
to medicare, medicaid, and social security will not be affected, and neither will national security. all other discretionary government programs will. finally, i have called for a bipartisan fiscal commission, a panel of democrats and republicans who would sit down and hammer out concrete deficit reduction proposals by a certain deadline. we have heard plenty of talk and yelling about deficits, and it is time to come together and make the painful choices we need to eliminate those deficits. this past week, 53 democrats and republicans voted for this commission in the senate, but it failed when seven republicans who had co-sponsored the idea in the first place suddenly decided to vote against it. it is one thing to have an honest difference of opinion about something. i will always respect those who take a principled stand for what they believe, even if i disagree with it. what i will not accept is changing positions because it is good policy. i will not accept opposition for opposition's sake. i am eager and ready to work with anyone who is serious about solving the real problems facing our pe
CSPAN
Jan 7, 2010 5:00pm EST
. they control my blood pressure and everything. it is not cost me a dime. i could be on medicare, but i chose not to do it. i've been with the va since i got out of the service in 1971. but why are all of these tests being run? and i know it costs money. host: thank you. in fact, testing has been a regular theme of your story here is 1 "new yorker" article with the headline, "testing, testing." guest: your caller hit the button on one of the issues driving the process, the malpractice system, which is driven in ways -- let me give you an example -- headaches. one community tried to look at how many ct scans and cedar rapids, iowa, they were doing for people. they did 50,000 cds dance for a population of 300,000 people a year. all of us know this is not necessary. 10,000 of them were for had ct scans, and only a tiny number of some of it was fear of malpractice suits. more significant part of it is that we have not really established what our process is, our appropriate guideline for care for handling the headaches so we can do it the right way, so we have tens of thousands of unnecessary ct s
CSPAN
Jan 16, 2010 7:00am EST
senator ben nelson? apparently he is asking for money for his state that would be used for medicare and he's asking not to take it anymore? guest: this was done essentially to get senator nelson's vote. it was to expand federal funding for medicare in nebraska. some said great, but what about our state? senator nelson took a lot of heat for this. he's a conservative leaning democrat in a strongly republican state. he's gone around the state and done all kinds of ads to explain his position, and finally he said to senator reed, let's take this off the table. he said let's give it to all states or take it out entirely. host: wlats going on in massachusetts -- with what's going on in massachusetts, how long until he could be sworn into the senate? guest: this is a matter of contention. you haveçó democratic-leaning officials in massachusetts saying it may take two weeks to officially process the win. thers÷ tradition in the senate it is not disputed, you get that person in there as quickly as possible. i can bet republicans would be crying foul if democrats tried to string this out and lea
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2010 8:00pm EST
this historical legislation. it is right alongside such security and medicare. -- social security and medicare. >> in number of moderates have said [inaudible] what changes are critical? >> we want our final product to ensure affordability to the middle cows, accountability for the insurance companies, and by lowering costs for every stage. those of the standards that we have. >> [inaudible] >> i prefer to call and the public's options. we want to increase competition. there are ways to do that. we look forward to having those discussions as to reconcile the bill. unless the whole the insurance counties -- companies accountability, we will not have affordability for the middle class. we need to end discrimination on the basis of pre-existing conditions, to cap payments and co-payments. it is about affordability. that is essential to accessibility. we will have what we need to hold the insurance companies accountable. i contend that whatever we have coming out of this bill, we will hold them accountable. there will be crying out. -- they will be crying out. >> [inaudible] right now there has be
CSPAN
Jan 5, 2010 11:00pm EST
to go to a certain facility, this case first before medicare pays. it is fair. they are still providing a roof over your head and other things. quality is another issue. the second piece is if you use a home community-based option with medicaid and the package of options in the state include the tough stuff such as desisted technology, transportation, personal assistance. -- assisted technology, transportation, personal assistance. you still need $1,500 to do other things in your house. whatever your acute bonus injury is, this is on top of it. that is how we try to leave this. the last beasley tried to do is swear senator kennedy had been all wrong. this was never meant to put certain people out of business. we did a lot of exploration as to where this has been our of the last few years and where they are right now. they need a jump-start in order to work. this program is not the end all be all. it is to go together with the long-term care products that are out there. we had the five years in here for a reason. it was to make sure that the government that the participation they needed.
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2010 7:00am EST
-span. finally, i believe the way out of this health-care mess is to open up medicare, certainly to page 55, and allow the medicare to cherry pick help the citizens such as myself. i pay $7,000 out of pocket every year. i've only used $700 in health insurance. there would be left over profit that could go to medicare. the must be millions who would not use their health care if medicare would open. we don't have to be in the shark tank with private insurers who would deny claims. host: and then they'll, virginia. on the democrats' line. caller: good morning. i think this is pathetic that c- span is sending letters out. i did not ever remember when c- span ever sent a letter during the bush administration. obama said that, yes. he said from the white house. i remember john mccain, both parties, and all -- every other health institution was there to discuss what was going on. if you see the level of people calling, the intellectualism has drastically dropped. the guests invited over at c- span and his supporters and the people who comment always spew their venomous about partisan shship which
CSPAN
Jan 20, 2010 5:00pm EST
've dealt with medicare patients for my entire practice, when you take $500 billion out of a plan that's already underfunded and goes upside down in premiums in about 2017 and beginning next year, the baby boomers hit, three million to three and a half million every year, you take half a trillion dollars out and add 30 million to 35 million people, three things happen. you have decreased access, two, you're not going to be able to get in to see the doctor, two, you have decreased quality and three, seniors get this their costs are going to get up to get the needed care they need. mr. akin: doctor, you are so eloquent and said it so smoothly, i think you we need to underline what you said. what you're saying is we're going to take $500 billion out of medicare. is this a republican that's going to raid medicare? mr. roe: no, sir. mr. akin: we've been accused of raiding medicare. but it's not us. mr. roe: no, sir, unless you're in florida, of course. mr. akin: if you take $500 billion out of medicare, it's going to be harder to provide services for people. you're not doing just that, you'
CSPAN
Jan 29, 2010 6:30pm EST
costs, all the insurance reforms, we're going to lower the costs of medicare and medicaid and it will not cost anybody anything. that is great politics, it is just not true. so there has got to be some test of realism in any of thesexd proposals, mine included. i have to hold myself accountable and guarantee the american people will hold me accountable if what i am selling does not actually deliver. >> mr. president, a point of clarification. what is in the better solutions book are all the legislative proposals that were offered. >> i understand that. i have actually read your bills. >> through 2009. >> i a understand. -- i understand. >> the summary document you receive this backed up by precisely the kind of detailed legislation that speaker pelosi android restoration have been busy ignoring for 12 months. >> i have read your legislation. i take a look at this stuff and the good ideas we take. here is the thing that all this have to be mindful of. it cannot be all nothing, one way or the other. would the mean by that is thisÑi if we put together a stimulus package in w
CSPAN
Jan 9, 2010 7:00am EST
is essentially a medicare tax that hits individuals who earn more than $200,000 a year and couples earning more than $250,000 a year. it does reflect that principal. we can see the final bill coming out from what's already in the senate version. from those decisions mbings it's the wall street journal that reported he is going to meet with labor leaders on monday. what's the significance of that. labor has been one of the most vocal proponents of the past. getting higher benefits and trading wage increases. they may end up having to be taxed on those benefits or see employers get rid of them. key to reach out labor and try to alleviate concerns. labor is making clear they are going to make a lot of noise about this. >> our guest until 9:15 if you have questions about the current working bill. guest: the public plan and the whole debate over whether the bill should include the public plan and what m many should see as the mechanism about what the public plan could do. a brief description. they get technical. basically in short, this is a mechanism of people buying on the individual market for pe
CSPAN
Jan 22, 2010 11:00pm EST
. there it is good news. compared to medicare, social security is in reasonably good shape. with some relatively small adjustments, you can have that solvent for a long time. i know people are concerned about it. social security we can fix. in terms of the cola, it stands for the cost of living allowance. it is put in place to make sure that social security is keeping up with inflation. here's the problem. this past year, because of the severity of the recession, we did not have inflation. we actually had deflation. so prices actually fell last year. as a consequence, technically, seniors were not eligible for a cost-of-living adjustment because prices did not go up in the aggregate. that does not mean that individual folks were not being pinched by higher heating prices or what have you. but on average, prices went down. here's what we did. of congress here, we did vote to provide a $250 one-time payment to seniors, which, when you factored it in, amounted to about 1. 8 percent. so it was almost the equivalent of the cola, even though it wasn't actually the cola. so we didn't forget seniors. we
CSPAN
Jan 6, 2010 1:00pm EST
the center for medicare education, the better jobs better care of national program. she was a political appointee during the clinton administration, serving in the department of health and human services. she also was assistant secretary for aging in 1997. she is been a senior researcher for health services research and project hope center for health affairs previously. to begin, but welcome to the podium. let's welcome him to the podium. >> people tend to view long-term care through a particular lands, depending on what they are interested in. some people focus on specific federal programs. they might focus on quality issues or workforce issues. they also tend to focus on specific populations of elderly. as carol levine said in her article, the whole is often eclipsed by a separate part. this article is an attempt to paint a picture of that hole, although i realize there are plenty of my own biases in it. we include people receiving long-term care from public programs, from family members, from private paid workers, whether they live in the community or institutions, whether they are e
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